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. it is also worth noting if the principle of law of this project would allow other units. as you recall legislation was passed that it was to be tracked this project. it concludes 1 hundred and 20 units. since they would like to allocate all the units and the project could be flexly. the students rely on bicycling in the area. and aside from the variance the department has received letters of support and the central market benefit district and the california college of the arts. the department has received other letters. thank you. thank you project sponsor. we have our slide show? >> you can start it. good afternoon commissioners my name is patrick kennedy and i'm the project sponsor. i'm pleased to be here today, the first qualified student project in san francisco. i've been involved in berkeley and have built 5 hundred units plus in berkeley. the project in the upper left-hand side of the scene was from a downtown project since world war ii. in 2007 i sold the portfolio of the buildings and decided to develop housing and specifically student housing in san francisco. i did quite a
for the principle of law of this. it is designed to help other people in the neighborhood. and it's not a (inaudible) restaurant. it would have the underground floor space into an active area for businesses use. and final it will create 8 to 10 job openings. and again, the recollection for the country club it is a free place for people who are recovering from drug and alcohol use. although the leg decision of the country club - part of the cities housing places on the second floor - the second floor roof-deck has been sdientd to minimize enjoys. as you can see in the patience the rear deck has been sub divided into two sections. the second portion it retired for the planning code for to serve as a unit space for businesses. and there are physical barriers that are designed between those two open spaces. and finally, castro country club the project site is well served by transportation and will have little impact in the neighborhood. and this will conclude my presentation if you have any questions, i'll be happy to answer them >> is there is presentation by the planning commission. >> i'm the archi
wiener has improved the law but that sounds like a gini pig situation to me. i emphasize there are people in the community feel this will greatly add to the cost of living there in terms of extra designer fees, contractor, expediter fees and that will make it hard for people with young families to stay in the neighborhood. thank you. >> president fong: additional speakers who have called? >> hello. my name is kenneth wingard on the castro benefit district and the market octavia plan community advisory committee. and have a degree in architectural preservation. today i am here as a four decade resident of the neighborhood. i've renovated a 1860's cottage that was designated as unsalvageable and in 1905 edwardian that had fallen into disrepair. i fell in love with the neighborhood with these diamonds in the rough and have been delighted at the current glorious state of the neighborhood. there is no question that everyone loves the neighborhood. my lovely neighbors who i respect a lot, myself, it's just a matter of how we should take care of the neighborhood that we love. the charming idea t
coast. i went to undergrad at duke university. i went to law school at harvard. after clerking for a judge, i came out here in 1997. i have been here for the last 14 years. i have always lived in the castro. i am an attorney. i started out in private practice. i settle private law firm during complex commercial litigation. in 2002, and moved over to the sentences the city attorney's office where i worked on the trial team doing trials for the city, handling my own cases, and supervising a team of attorneys as well. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? >> i always assumed i would go back to the philadelphia area since that is where my family is. i was always interested in san francisco in terms of what it is as a city, its culture, it's amazing lgbt community. i came out here for a summer, fell in love with it. i have been interested in politics since i was a kid. i worked on campaigns as a teenager. i was involved campaign against senator jesse helms when i was in college. when i cannot hear, and was not initially involved politically. -- when i came out here, i was
. we have item 1212-11sp-1, adoption of board policy 6020 to conform with the current law and the findings of the audit. i believe that we have a reading by superintendent or designee. >> thank you, i would like to ask jill hooferdike to please present. >> good evening, we are requesting action of 1212 to confirm with the findings of the spring. >> okay, i have no speaker card for this item. are there any comments from the board or superintendent? vice president fewer. >> yes, i believe that the curriculum committee heard this policy. and i think we -- refresh my memory, it was a while ago that we gave a positive recommendation on to the board. yes. >> commissioner wynns. >> what we are doing to conform with current laws, what changes are we making and what do we otherwise not conform? >> we currently don't have an existing board policy entitled parent involvement. we don't have one at hall -- all. we are putting one in place to conform with the requirements. >> okay, roll call please. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> ma >> -- maufas.
and moral violations and behavior contrary to law, and explaining the concept of moral imperative to a child. so they know when to make an ethical violation than the moral and imperative. that is it's already to lie to save your life. i would like to field questions concerning nonviolent parenting. anyone with a question? >> unfortunately we are not able to engage in a dialogue on this topic. we can't discuss items not on the agenda. this is your time to talk to us. >> how can i get on your agenda? >> that's a good question. >> here is my information yet once again. i would love to get on your agenda. i would be happy to meet with anyone on this topic. i think that it can decrease the level of violence in the schools and increase test scores. please contact me with the next step of this important topic. thank you very much. >> okay. thank you very much. we are now going to move to item k. advisory committee reports and appointments by board members. any appointments this evening? seeing none. i am pleased to introduce our elections commission report. delivered by our election commission appo
" is manifested through the media, and law enforcement for numbers. it was more of a community. i did not go to school and meet somebody. i lived on this block and this is where my grandmother's house was, or i was born and raised. what people may see on tv was at my front door. the killing and the dope dealing. it was right there. this was a community list of people, we just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother wa
bought my coffee from pete, from pete's coffee. in the 1970s when i was in law school, i lived in the mission and i bought my bagels at holy bagel. i opened a little cafe on what was something just built, something called united nations plaza and i was cited by the city, by the department of public works for violation of section 723 of the public code for trying to put tables on the plaza and have a nice outdoor cafe. i had had to get a letter virtually signed by every member of the board of supervisors and had to sit down with the director of public works to be able to put tables on the plaza. as a result, the code was changed, and that opened the doors for outdoor dining in san francisco. later, things also changed to allow for hot dog carts. you might remember problems that you had with stanley steemer. this man complies with what is required to have a food truck. dpw has given him had a permit. i go downtown from time to time, i stand in line at different places, trying to get a cup of coffee, a cappuccino, an expresso. this is in compliance with what is now the existing l
and police officers, law enforcement. i'm curious what role law enforcement can play in restoretive justice, what can be imparted as groups of people who may or may not be connected with the trauma. once you are traumatized by the school, politicians, et cetera, et cetera, then you have more of these power dynamic things going on in your head, i'm going to exert whatever power i have on these people, i'm interested in hearing about the restoretive power that we want to be part of the change. >> our organization just had a grant to partner with the department of justice to make films on exactly those kinds of things. we're going to be making a film on working with school resource officers and how to work with students. we don't believe we should even call anyone a bully because once you get labeled it stays with you. i've gotten letters saying there's a bully in my kid's first grade. the statistics show that about a third of the kids are bullied and bully others. as one kid said, i wanted to man up and show i wasn't going to be bullied so i did it to anyone else. breaking that cycle is g
that was a violation of the rules or law or what are they doing now that will be different, well they partnered with an outof state bank to seasonally say that we are no longer subject to the limits and 36 apr that is set in article california law and they partnered with an out-of-state bank and said, we are subject to federal segregation gleyings and is think charged an apr of four 100% and so they have agreed to abide by california's limits they have discontinued that relationship with the out-of-state bank and as they also have established this settlement fund to repay eligible bars to get restitution until the amounts that i described. >>> so if you go door loan do you have a comparison to give us an idea. average income or middle income do you have a concrete example of something like that to put dollars and cents of how much they were screwed? i can testimony you this it's har hard to come up with a timcal case but what you say because the interest rates being charged people could not get the principal paid down or the interest rate paid down because the number accumulating continued to
agency partners whether in law enforcement or fire or emergency management to bring in and collect all that information to a central node and our emergency center that filters the information i need to make decisions. now, our common operating picture, we developed initially based on military platforms. but we've migrate it had to a web-based solution that is open to all of our inter agency partners. it's on the dot-gov domain, it's password protected but it's not on our military proprietary systems. so, we can share the common operating picture that we have with cal ema and we've developed the ability to import data from every allied organization whether it's usgs, the law enforcement agencies, fire, weather, what have you, to be able to put it out in layers so we literally can know everything going on. we can see lightning strikes that cause fires, down to the size of a car fire. we're often able to do predictive analysis that exceeds the ability of fire and other agencies and able to call them up because we can see this and we've trained our battle captains that work in our operatio
, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so proud of san francisco in
and can be so insidious behind closed doors. the governor signed a bill into law and my office and the l.a. county sheriff have committed to keeping track and data of crimes that occur involving the internet or social media because we frankly don't have good data around that, particularly involved with crime so for the next couple of years we do will a lot of data collection and working with law enforcement and they're doing it and address this problem from evidence and outcome based area. thank you. >> thank you. >> no name other than more work for nance's staff. -- >> what we do in oakland -- i don't think bullying is more than a school issue. this is bully center thed. there is a way the violence perm mates across the board and i strongly believe that schools are the heart of health and community well being and the way we're going to transform this world is coming around our kids. we have a sacred obligation and kids to be safe and well connected and well known is all of us, all of us, all the time and even in the room today and the pretense and around the punter -- the question
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs. the stated purpose of the bill is that it would help alleviate overcrowding in state prisons and county jails, and ease pressure on california's court system and result in millions of dollars in annual savings for both state and local governments. senator mark leno who couldn't join us today as been quoted as saying, quote, there's been no evidence to suggest long prison sentences deter or limit people from abusing drugs. in fact, time behind bars and felony records often have horrible, unintended consequences for people trying to overcome addiction because they are unlikely to receive drug treatment in prison and have few job prospects and educational opportunities when they leave. this legislation will help implement public safety realignment and protect our communities by reserving prison and jail space f
francisco, he was the managing attorney for the asian law caucus. i first met ed in 1992 when he became the executive director for the human rights commission and we were both 16. that's two decades ago, ed. i watched him soon become the director of city purchasing and then going on to become the director of public works. i think ed is the only mayor in city history that can carry tlau on the campaign promise to fill the potholes because he actually knows how and he's the only mayor in city history that can say he actually knows every single city street because his crews probably paved them. i have had the privilege of working alongside ed for many years in city government. he has always been a cherished colleague and friend to everyone in city hall. he's done the job, he gets the job done, never wanting credit, just the satisfaction of doing the right thing for the people he serves in the city and county of san francisco. i was thinking about the introduction of mayor ed lee lastity and we'll taking the time to think about ed as mayor and ed as leader. i've been lucky to know ever
. i don't know if the numbers has gone down or they are obeying the law more. >> you did your job in the '80s. >> the question here, i don't think there has been a lot of dispute over the incidents. there is probably some dispute over the exact happenstance over the more serious incident and therefore, i accept that there has been a number of issues here that warrant some level of penalty. the contrary side to that is the fact that there were some due process issues. one in terms of the 20 days. and i was also not overly impressed by the nature of the hearing process that i read in the transcript. it was not very well-done and i didn't think it was just an issue of language, but what i read into statements. how people were directed. how they were allowed -- and i didn't find it very appropriate to a city agency in terms of how we deal with our citizens, no matter how guilty they may be. so i would probably, based on that, as a counter, and i don't disagree that they have found significant incidents that warrant penalty, but i would reduce the penalty, just because of the due pro
county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this out and talk about it and to create an alternative or to help other students or to educate others stop the practices or to interpret what bullying is. a lot of us didn't know what that was. now if you allow generations to think there's no consequence, bullying becomes harassment, harassment becomes physical with scars and then you've got, i hate to say the word, but you have gangs of kids who don't know the difference. that's what we naed to educate ourselves on.
of law enforcement, educators and industry and a variety of other folks and nonprofits organizations and really understand the issue and dive into it. it's been awesome and a ton of learning has gone into this. alice is amazing. everything that happened with time warner and got together a year ago and partnered up on this and wouldn't it be great if we got two major media organizations together, one traditional media which has a a lot of strength in eaching people via tv and one reaching people socially and if you could gather these together imagine what we can do? and so i think you called sizzle real. it was a sizzling experience to be in a high school in hare land and felt like a football pep rally but it was about bullying and they all took the pledge to stop it when they see it and amazing experience and tip of the hat to time warner to really understanding the issue and putting the weight of the media empire behind it to reach people, and second of all understanding how you sort -- there is the bully and there is the person being bullied but what if we got the 99% of other
. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also have data we want to provide to the society at large. and how do we not step on our own toes and give awa
with duct tape. there should be a law. have your disaster kit in that room, have snacks available for kids. turn off the hvac, heating, ventilation air conditioning units because you don't want to be blowing in or sucking in the vapor cloud outside. fireplace, close the dampers and seal off your shelter in place room by using duct tape and terms of the emergency alert system. listen to the radio. that's it. do not try to call the school, try to pick up your children because do you want to leave the area? no, you want to shelter in place. people own pets. do not risk your safety for pets. in summary, it is likely you are at an incident that may be involved with bnice, your safety is the most important. limit your time, get your distance away from that and some type of shielding and listen to the emergency alert system, your radio. . >> there's an acronym that we use to use an extinguisher. what's that acronym? we're going to take turns putting out this fire. you can see that it will make a pretty big mess but at least it put out the fire in your house or something like that. so when we want
in the last congress when later closing was speaker of the house. she had had 16 tax cuts signed into law to help small businesses grow and thrive. as we know, during the last 15 years, small businesses account for about 2/3 of the job growth in our country, but when the bush recession hits in 2009, 2010, small businesses were hit particularly hard. small businesses are the center of her agenda. congress under her leadership gave 27 million small businesses tax cuts. two main pieces of legislation -- the small businesses jobs act in the information you have, will create a total of 500,000 jobs and create eight tax cuts. they are all described in the packet you have. also, unleashing up to $300 billion in credit for small businesses to access. there are another eight tax cuts that were passed through a number of different laws. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart
the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human part, that is the part that should have consequences and not be ignored. otherwise the legislation really isn't doing what it's supposed to do, so thank you all very much. i really give a shout out to san francisco unified because they have been very, very on top of this issue, way ahead of the curve. >> thank you, gentlemen, so much. (applause). >> just a couple of comments. we're not going to take a big official break. if people need to get up individually, please do so. we have one more panel then we will take a break, a lunch break, lunch will be served at the table and you will have time at that point to chat with people and to take a break. before we move to the next panel, if i could have your attention, please, i just want to acknowledge some of the people in the room today are our law enforcement partners. and some of them have come almost directly from a funeral yesterday of a fallen hero, kenyon youngstrom, of the c
yesterday and the subject wag illegal in-law units which are present throughout the city and one of the group in the specific area in the city indicated it was his feeling up to 80% of the units there had illegal -- or housing individual housing units there had an illegal unit in it. and i think this is an issue that we have to confront eventually because it's got a lot of -- it's a lot of effects on the entire housing stock. and one of them that came to mind for me is the fact that when there are two units in building it raises the price of building significantly and you really have prices based upon two units, not on one. and it might explain why, when i and starting to practice places in modest homes in the sunset and richmond victor were around 40,000. the increases each in the most pricey areas are 10 times what they were in those days, 10 to maybe 12 times. in places like the sunset and parts of the richmond, they're 20 times. these houses are selling for 800,000. so i'm not saying the total cause of this is secondar secony units, but it does detract from the affordability
in that state betrayal that come from learning some green things are not good. considering the law averages that a body in motion stays in motion unless faced with an equal or opposite force, peer pressure, skitology the projected near devastation of world forest should population the motdz of toilet paper consumption. germs vary. my role in the pressing the mean agent of common human hygiene i knew i never wanted to be near that state again. with extradition i was hardly away at all. when i first rolled over my parents were pleased and i left the state of never having rolled before. ditto, something on all fours to crawling. and once i could walk we all knew i was never going back. i just pulled myself up and started moving. i grabbed at everything i could reach until i learned better i put my tongue on anything. once iate papaya straight from the tree and i mourned the abject state of created fruit i living in that state in my ignorance thought i loved. i denounce such love. i married a local. i taught myself how to keep his garden. i swear i'm staying away from that state for good. i hea
in the most humane way? i've had those discussions with our law enforcement agencies, whether it's bill silverman or adult probation with wendy stills or the youth programs with karen onion and marie sue scprts running the youth programs or our police chief or our fire chief or any of the numerous other leaders, and they all know they can have the best programs as well, but if the people who are doing the violence aren't reached those programs are half backed. they're not as good. i wouldn't throw them all out, but they're not good enough because people still live in fear in our housing projects, wherever they maybe in the housing developments or the run down 10aments that we have that we will attempt to rebuild and you heard me again. it's not about the brick and mortar. it's not rebuilding the physical structures of that. we will do that. we have the money to do that. we have the resources to do that, but it has been about hope sf, about rebuilding lives and giving hope first before we put the bricks and mortar in because if we don't have people believing they have a non violent
that unconventional. [laughter] let's repeal child labor laws that we fought hard for in this country. bring in dickens to chronicle it. i do think there is the cruelty amidst the reality show debates we have been subjected to. who is running this, entertainment or news? there is a cruelty when people cheer that someone dies without health care or bbo a soldier that dies in iraq. >> i am joking about herman cain. he is a guy who cannot hide the truth well. that makes me more comfortable with the idea that i know who he is about so i can make a decision. >> are you talking about the women coming forward or the fact that he said he did not know what he would do about afghanistan when he became president and would check it out? [laughter] >> we have had presidents who have been reelected like that. we talked about transparency in the value to our society. -- and the value to our society. chris matthews was here peddling his latest jfk book. he is a huge fan. was jfk under estimated? that is the debate going on. talk about controlling the message. in the obama administration, we talk about their
and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, next the navy in the coastal communities and in san feir fernandes island and doing an airlift to the most affected area. sanfernandes island is a very small island, only a thousand people living there, but it was completely destroyed. that's what we found when we arriving there, debris everywhere, and as you can see that was the port and the square before, and that was after. so the change is, it's quite impressive. the same was a local pier and a school. that was a school. nothing. so we put in the navy, the navy put them in there two, three combat ships, type 23's and l ship and transport plus mtaa aircraft transport, aircraft and hell helicopters to try to help people in there. we used the ships to deliver food, clothes and all that stuff without any problem. also we helped in different matters that the navy can do that. for instance here was with divers and with submarine robot to find bodies. getting medical assistance,
by the rules and laws they come up with for the rest of us like the ones on food stamps and the minimum wage by isabel, ienda >> i promise that i will not take my clothes off in public. >> i wish it would snow in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks, michael age 13 from long island, new york. >> free medical care for everyone, dorothy, age 72, new york, new york. >> i wish for all of the lonely people in the world to find happiness. daniel, steele, the author. >> i wish that we could bring all of our soldiers home now, anonomous. >> thank you, everyone. >> you can't make that stuff up, i tell you that was incredible, i know when the mayor leaves town they appoint a mayor for the day and i think that hannah should be the supervisor for the day when scott is out of town, thank you, hannah. >> okay, if you are following your program, throw it away or take it home with you so you know who was here today but he always have to change things around a little bit. i am thrilled that we have the mayor with us and we have the council general of japan with us and i want to b
they acquired it as publicly, part of the treaty said you had to all mexican law, which set a certain amount of outside plants must be used for schools, playgrounds, open space. the original chaldea san francisco -- the original county of san francisco came from san mateo county. they decided it was too large a county, said the card off another county. at the time, the largest population in the state was in san francisco. l.a. barely made a presidio. they had, like, 50 or 60 people. 90% of the population was in san francisco, and everyone down the peninsula is saying if they are in the county, san francisco has this huge population, we are going to have to go along with them, so they can't get off -- they carved it off. >> it looks like it is the richmond district, but a kind of shows what was on the west side town. a great deal of it was sam, and for that reason, people thought that the weather and the san -- it was really not a place that people wanted to live, and it was going to be very typical for san francisco -- very difficult for san francisco to expand west. >> if you look at the ea
to speak and found guilty. for the lovers torn apart and for the ones kept apart by, laws and prejudices. for the spare rows and the humming birds and for the weeds and the hararas and for the women of gaza. for the one tortured in the darkness. for the refugees wrapped in barbed wire. for each and every human being who sleeps tonight out in the rain. for shelter, for every human being who sleeps tonight out in the rain. for the child with nostalgia to be born, for every child to get home safe. for the elderly alone, for the worldwide end of hate, disease, and poverty. for a just world still to come, where no one goes hungry and the water is clean. and prisons are outlawed and schools are free. and exciting. and poetry, mandatory. for police and politicians. for the indians of the amazon and for the jaquar faced for extinction and for the battle to stop and for every last gun to be forged into a pen, and for the most hopeless, hopeless in the world, those without even dreams to get by. here there is 100, 10,000 origamis waiting for you, floating in the rainbow of hope >> thank you. >> sa
aspects of our rent control laws that make it difficult to find those kinds of temporary accommodations at below market rent. i have been working with groups on legislation that introduced that will help there. i have also requested an economic impact study to be performed on the entertainment and nightlife industries. it is a very important economic and cultural sector in our city. we have never really taken a look at what it contributes to our economy. i think that is an important piece of information to have to guide policy making in the future. i have requested a hearing on the impact of historic preservation of other important policy goals in the city like creating affordable housing, having usable parks and libraries, etc. i want to look at how those different policies interact with each other. those are a few things i am working on. >> we are out of time. we will have to wrap this up. thank you so much for joining us. we have been talking to supervisor wiener from district 8. watch for the next episode of "need your supervisor." we will be back with one of our 11 city supervisors
stakes consequence and it is anti-bullying laws and et cetera it is more likely children are actually not going to speak up, and it causes this sweeping under the rug and i just think this needs to be addressed and i wanted to thank you for your comment about connecting the false assumption that bullying is always linked to suicide. that's something that was talked about at the federal summit that we need to separate these two issues out to some extent and one of the things -- well, i will just ask -- i guess my question is -- sorry. so much to share -- >> i thought something that was interesting and i am trying to remember what i wanted to say i wanted to say our approaches are converging in opposite ways and students feel safe to get the bullying addressed but the policies are punitive and high stakes and we know that zero tolerance is not the case and makes things work and gives a one week vacation. you can leave school for a week, have fun and when you come back you get to do what you did before. thank you. >> thanks. one thing i always thought disciplining kids you is you hav
like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and sp
lawyer hours of some of the best law firms in america. part of the frustration that exists regarding immigration -- and i was just at a white house meeting monday and tuesday of this week on this issue -- it relates to the anchor -- the anger people have saying that is broken and we cannot fix it and there's nothing we can do. that is wrong. we have an ability to fix the problem. we should fix the problem. the aba rendered a report that it will continue to act as a resource in fixing the problem. these are things they have online if you are interested. suddenly, you could visit our website feared by the way, if we do not get to your question, i will see you out back. happy to talk to you about anything you want to talk about. >> we should all remember that most of us are at least descendants of immigrants. one thing about justice in a different sense -- i have a question here that says that some constitutions -- and they mention the cuban one -- include health and literacy as basic rights. should we think of those as basic rights? you will certainly realize that at least as to help,
in seattle, went to college in maine, this tiny college out there. he decided to come back and get his law degree from uc-berkeley, and then was appointed by art agnos in government in 1979. he became the director of the human rights commission under willie brown. he became the director of public works. 2005 city administrator, and then the fateful day in january 2011 when the board of supervisors could not decide on anybody and decided that family was not going to be a threat to their future political aspirations. [laughter] he got more than six votes, six more than anyone else. and he became the interim mayor. he did an amazing job. he is outspoken, both feet on the ground, a person you can trust, a person who is very honest, and based upon his experience, knows how to get the job done. i believe he is the best player ever that san francisco has had. we are so lucky to have him up there. he has balanced the budget, reform pensions, created jobs, and mayor, it has been a pleasure to work with you. i look forward to working with you further. they san francisco transplant coming down here t
someone to guess what profession he wound up going into. law enforcement. he was not with the lapd. he was with a smaller police department for 30 years. he has since retired. he has been married twice. he has raised four children. he has lived an extraordinary life. i am grateful for having had him in my life as a guidepost. i do think it is the ultimate irony that he turned out to be a police officer. >> we have some other questions. very good questions. we do not have much time. i work at san quentin prison. they segregate inmates based on color and gangs. why do prisons not work on educating inmates on social relations, racial tolerance, and why don't they find a way so the different races can get to know each other? >> i would like to enter that. segregation has -- i would like to answer that. segregation has always been a problem in this country. i grew up in new orleans. we believe that education is the key. we all need to sit at the table. i do not believe in segregation for inmates. they need to tear that barrier down and put people together, no matter what. when we go inside
, tray, my wife, naomi, my sister joy, and my mother-in-law. they have been supporting me for a long time. behind this individual all board, there's a team of people that are responsible for making things happen. just for a moment, i want the puc to raise their hand and give a shout. we have a lot of folks who really committed in making the systems wwork. again, we have billions of dollars that we are entrusted with delivering in a timely way, which needs to be within budget. systems like this will really elevate and make it really transparent that we are delivering these programs in a very conscious and deliberate way so we can save the ratepayers' money. with that, i just want to thank you guys for this award. thank you. [applause] [applause] >> if you are a consultant or you work for a company that does work for the puc, raise your hand. that's about half the room. thank you, harlan kelly. >> it does not matter just where you're going to go. it matters how you're going to get there. our team came together in 2008 and we started looking at procuring something to navigate us away from pa
between federal and state law on that, strong beliefs that people have about it, we make a pledge that we will look at every loan to make sure there is positive community impact. i think that is at least controversial enough to choose not to do it. we have not had a request yet, so i have not had to rule on that. >> we have a question in the back. >> i wanted to ask wells fargo, what is your interest rate on a loan? >> 6%. 2.75% over prime. >> ok. the second question, is a line of credit like a payroll advancement? i am a small business. just recently got contracts in san francisco. as you say, they pay slow. i want to get a loan for $50,000, but i do not want to pay the interest. i would like to get a payroll advancement where the money is available to me, should i needed for payroll. if i should need it, i can get that money. when the city pays me back, i pay them back, but that line of credit is still there. is that what they line of credit is? >> yes, ma'am. as you have a need for something to pay -- in this case, your bills -- before you get your invoices paid, that you would be able
of over 28 agencies public and private representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank y
effective, to be able to communicate more clearly with other law-enforcement agencies. that is something that we do need to work on. with regards to crime in the district, i would say that our district is more impacted by a lot of property crime. we see many cars being broken into. many quality of life issues -- graffiti. we see cars being stolen, those kinds of issues. we do have other kinds of incidences. shootings that might have occurred, but they are not as frequent. our quality of life issues and burglary issues are more prevalent. with some of the recent changes with the police department to get investigators out to the district stations, i think that has been a big improvement and will help focus some of the investigators' time to deal with crimes that people might not think our high impact, but have a big footprint in terms of our district's crime rates. but governor brown has proposed -- >> governor brown has proposed redevelopment agencies. hawhat are your thoughts on tha? supervisor chu: we currently have plans that really are dependent on having the development agencies and
and immediately saw a need to change a few things in order to stay competitive. >> father-in-law back in the sixties had a fairly typical orchard for this area, where he would have a number of varieties to go through the season and he would pack them, and they would get marketed with others doing the same thing. as the market changed, we had a choice to make: either get bigger or find a niche market. >> in addition to changing the fruit they grow, the loewens also strived to change the way they grew their fruit. long before the days of organic and in a time when farmland around them was rapidly disappearing, the loewens, along with some local farmers, came up with a set of growing guidelines called "california clean," which later became the catalyst for them going 100% organic. >> taking care of the land--the idea is to do something that can be done forever. >> and today through meticulous maintenance of the land and careful planning, the family can now offer an assortment of unique varieties that ripen at different times, offerin customers a variety of sweet, exotic colors and fruits
anything special. we want people to basically adhere to the regulations and laws as they are on the books now. people can also, just be cognizant if they have stuff on the street, they thaoed to have 48 inches so we can pass, think outside your own spectrum of yourself that there are other people you need to share the sidewalk with. we will all get along better. >> although san francisco is a hilly place for a whraoel chair user, we seem to be better at most. that doesn't mean we can't continue to improve upon ourselves. >> the public has a clear are -- of travel. we can't be every to make sure that is the place. we have to rely on the place. call 311. give them your name. that goes into a data base. >> it is difficult, still, um to make the case that the disabled community isn't being represented. in some ways we are not. we have a long way to go. >> the city of san francisco is using the most innovative technology available. these devices allow people to remain out in their communities, doing things like shopping. it is great to be able to walk as a pedestrian in this city and cross str
to it gets to be too specific and might be interpreted as, you know, unequal protection under the law, where you're dealing with certain communities and giving them more favorable treatment than you are everybody in the city. everybody has to be treated the same and that's what this document should deal with and not give preferential treatment to some groups because of their situations. >> president fong: commissioner wu. >> vice president wu: i want to thank director rahaim for bringing this forward. thithere is a role for buildinge character of the department and seeing the shared values toward doing this work in the city. there is a reason people want to be planners in this city. to that end, i actually -- i like the values statements. i like especially these top ones about collaboration, education, open dialogue. of course, we could administer, but i don't want to get into sort of wordsmithing -- not just word smithing, but sort of adding and focusing on which ones to include, which ones not to include. i think the mission statement is less successful because it called out these five bul
through how each of us relates, what are the limitations, what are the laws, what are the rules of engagement, how do we actually work together? and that sets the stage for everything that has come beyond that. the big exchange of information at a very high level and it quickly led to the conclusion we all understand the policy of it, but as was the case in a lot of situations, we don't get past the diagram. we don't get past the policy page and the wire die agrams and if we want to make this meaningful we need to get past the next level and we need to start stretching the boundaries and start talking it each other in as close to real world situations as we can so we each understand how the other operates, what the limitations are, what the boundaries are, and from there we can start to grow as institutions and try to make this institutional knowledge and not just individual relationships. so in 2011, we took it to the next step and we took a table top and we picked medical surge. a lot of people looked at that and said, well, there's there's this and there's that and the mi
the amazing men and women of our law enforcement agencies and our emergency response teams, you are my heroes. you are the ones that run in when everybody else is supposed to run out. and we see the drama all the way from 9-11 through katrina to whatever the next catastrophe is going to be. we live in a nuclear age. who would have predicted the united states would be fully invested in a response in japan? who would have predicted several years ago when a tsunami hit a country in indonesia which was predominately anti-american in its sentiment, mostly because of disinformation, mostly because as people grew up there they were given propaganda and told stories about the american those and what we do and how we do it, and they learned to feel we were the enemy. then they saw through that catastrophe, they saw the response of the lincoln battle group, they saw american military men and women in uniform as well as partnering with non-governmental organizations like project hope, operation smile, doctors without borders, they saw all those people coming off the ships and taking care of their lo
. we support the governor, mainly law enforcement and the fire services here in the state. we tend to do more emergency missions every year than any of the 53 states and territories combined. so, we have quite a bit of experience. with that experience has come a wealth of relationship building that's key to success and any disaster response is being able to work with the inter agency. we're in a unique position because in addition to my federal responsibilities for commanding both the army and the air national guard, i also serve as a member of the governor's cabinet and with that i work on a daily basis with all of the other state level assets and resources, cal ema, cal fire, the highway patrol, health and human services and all the other state entities that would respond to support local authorities. we have a full-time liaison officer embedded in cal ema that works there 7 days a week, 5 days a week to continue to develop and build that relationship. we exercise regularly at all levels of government. we exercise heavily with the local governments to plan and prepare. and we wor
not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a very significant ship that mrs. perry is the sponsor for. she's the sponsor for the u.s.s. cole and i want
raise last year. here, a little bit different. here, medical resources and law enforcement are owned by the governor which, as established, comes from the turkish government. fire fighters and things like public works are owned by the municipality. let me tell you about budget discrepancies. the fire department, i got to tell you, when i went and i met with the fire chief, that one left a mark. their fire department was red tagged but they didn't have a place because it was so cold to house their engines because you can't leave diesel engines out in the cold, just doesn't work too well, so they still had to use the facility but they housed the personnel in two tents out in front. their headquarters is one tent and their dorm is another tent and they welcomed us in there, didn't even think twice. and in the story of what it was like there, for a community of nearly 700,000 people, their complete complement of fire fighters that were on duty, their professional staff, was just over 40. they had 4 pieces of apparatus. the newest of which was over 10 years old. they kept it togeth
construction has to meet the requirements of today's code. they could have by law built the new tower to meet today's code and leave the old building to meet the old conditions. >> it was so badly damaged the city required it to be retrofitted. there was a retrofit done while debating whether to dynamite it. >> any new addition has to meet today's code. any part of the old building that supports the new addition vertically or laterally has to address today's code. we will walk a block down and look at the rialto building. (♪ music playing ) >> we're still here on mission street at the corner of annie alley. they're named, somebody told me they're named for san francisco's early famous ladies. (chuckling). >> i want to point out the building here at 660 mission street, which i believe is an unreinforced masonry building retrofitted, seismically upgraded. once it is seismically upgraded, it is safe, right? >> when you seismically upgrade it, it is to a standard it doesn't collapse, but it may not be reusable or repairable. >> it was an economic decision of how much money the city could a
in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do you think this is how harvey felt? and i said to him, it's exactly how harvey felt. now, after the march i learned that malan had refused to go into the
in san francisco. either the local law doesn't allow that kind of product or that kind of material, or we don't think it's safe. and i could give you some examples of that but basically 99% of the time we approve a list of products which has been tested, listed, and then approved by david or me. basically it's on behalf of the director of the department of building inspection. is that a good example? >> that's it. >> and day have i spends a lot of his time look at listings. tell us what this s. >> this is a cupling for electric metallic tubing. it's quite a large one. but the neat thing about this one is that it has a waterproof seal. it does not leak. this is a new advance in the industry. previously the fittings leaked and caused problems and now they're coming out with problems that don't leak. >> the codes require it be water -- >> the code requires all of these fittings outside subject to the rain be rain-proof. now the industries gradually are responding and providing rain-proof products. >> so my recollection is that we have damp proof and water proof. what is rain-proof? >> equipm
of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of system can accomplish that public safety health objective as well or better than a course of system, when the portu
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all
and the gentleman talking about going through law school in the '70s and i can relate to that experience going through night school. having a hard time trying to stay awake during procedures class. i recall a professor making key points and one thing he always said, you should always examine the issue of jurisdiction. i have two primary points on that issue. today as indicated or foreshadowed by brief the
] the regulations and laws which are being slowly worked on through the legal departments and the san francisco's legal department. but essentially we found the experience through innovation office has been driving the initiatives through and helping us develop and the data sets have bon become cleaner. they have become easier for us to use and the process has become a lot more efficient. >> school. -- cool. i was told if you have a question you should line up at that microphone right there. if you're coming up -- no, he did youant [speaker not understood]. >> i don't have a question. i wanted to comment on this. i think something else is really unique and maybe one of the untold stories or not told so much stories about the impact of open data is really the companies that are being formed. and as you mentioned earlier, they're a sustainable company and this is being powered by open data and motion loft is figuring out how they can share the asset that sort of your business model is built on. so, i think that this is presenting a whole new type of question for sort of apps built with government
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